RSS

Monthly Archives: September 2012

Flip Your Classroom

Last year, I offered a workshop titled, “Travel to the Flipped Classroom.”   Lisa Hootman was one of the teachers who attended (okay, she was the only teacher that attended), but that only meant that she received some very individualized instruction.    Fast forward, Lisa has created two class blogs on which she provides students with guided online instruction in the form of video that students can access to anytime, anywhere.  Lisa has “flipped” her classroom.

See > Lisa’s Biology blog and an example of Lisa flipping her Biology classroom.

See also > Lisa’s Jurnior English blog and an example of Lisa flipping her English classroom.

What is a “Flipped Classroom?”

You may have heard of the concept of “reverse instruction” (See > Reverse Instruction: Dan Pink and Karl’s “Fisch Flip” by Jonathan Martin),  which holds students accountable for viewing online lectures outside of class while using valuable class time for group and project work that might normally be assigned for homework.

What are the benefits?  

Educator John Sowash says, of his own experience in his blog post, Flip Your Classroom Through Reverse Instruction (Sept. 6, 2010):

“With class time liberated from lectures, I was able to incorporate more hands-on activities, projects, and helping students better understand confusing and challenging concepts.”

Is there data to support this practice?

Take a look at how Clintondale High School has implemented the concept.

The concept, also referred to as the “flipped” classroom or “flipped thinking” is becoming increasingly popular with the growing availability of free, online courseware and lectures.   Daniel Pink exclaimed in “Think Tank: Flip-thinking – the new buzz word sweeping the US”  that Khan Academy Creator and Teacher Karl Fisch, “has flipped teaching on its head” (Sept. 12, 2010).

A flipped classroom isn’t specific to video and it doesn’t have to be all or nothing.  There are simple, project-based ways to incorporate these strategies into your classroom.    See Flipping History by Jeff Utecht to see one way it can be done.

Still apprehensive?  Consider testing the process by using  video feedback or video grading.   There are endless opportunities.

(reprinted from my email of 5/8/12)

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 26, 2012 in Professional Development

 

What Does YouTube Teach Us About Education?

Over the past few years, I’ve been thinking a lot about how social media relates to education.  I’ve become especially interested in media literacy and the importance of helping students understand how media impacts them.   For example, I often ask myself:

What are the benefits of embracing media as a teaching tool?

What can media teach us about the way students learn?

Why is understanding the Internet and the use of media so important in education?

I’ve been most inspired by Professor Mike Wesch, cultural anthropologist at Kansas State University, who studies the impact that social media and technology has on our culture, it’s importance in the creation and dissemination of knowledge, and on the participatory nature of Internet.   The tagline for his blog, Digital Ethnography: Mediated Cultures, is “Our work explores how humans use media, how media uses us, and how we can use new media to reveal our insights in new ways.”

For a deeper and more fascinating look at digital ethnography, see > An Anthropological Introduction to YouTube, presented at the Library of Congress, June 23rd 2008.    The lecture is long, but well worth the investment of time.  At least watch the first 13 minutes!

You might be asking, “What does this have to do with high school?”

Well, Wesch is especially interested in how social media engages students and how social media changes the platform of teaching and learning from teacher-centered to student-centered.  He often refers to this as “participatory” teaching and learning.  I love his work because I believe that understanding how our students use media is critical to designing lessons that engage them and that promote critical thinking and problem solving.

One of my favorite lectures given by Wesch is, “From Knowledgeable to Knowledge Able,” Uploaded by on Oct 12, 2010.  THIS IS A MUST SEE!

I end with a rhetorical question for the day, “How are you preparing your students to solve the problems of tomorrow’s world?”

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 25, 2012 in Media Literacy

 

What Does YouTube Teach Us About Education?

Over the past few years, I’ve been thinking a lot about how social media relates to education.  I’ve become especially interested in media literacy and the importance of helping students understand how social media impacts them.  I often ask myself:

What are the benefits of embracing media as a teaching tool?
What can media teach us about the way students learn?
Why is understanding the Internet and the use of social media so important in education?

One of my favorite lectures on social media was given by Michael Wesch (Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Kansas State). 

Picture 10

It’s titled “From Knowledgeable to Knowledge Able,” Uploaded by TEDxTalks on Oct 12, 2010.  IT’S A MUST SEE! 

See > http://tinyurl.com/2czs86r.

Read more @ http://tinyurl.com/d6ts5d7

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 25, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

On Plagiarism

imagesDetecting plagiarism sure can be very time consuming!  I thought this would be the perfect opportunity to share some additional resources with you.

Educating students about the types of plagiarism can be very effective in preventing plagiarism.  Many students don’t even realize that they are plagiarizing.

See http://www.plagiarism.org/ to learn about the different types of plagiarism and for tips on preventing plagiarism.

You might also be interested in an article I recently read titled, “Designing Assignments That Discourage Plagiarism.”

If you do use one of the plagiarism detectors, you might consider compiling the results and sharing the data with your students.  Jamie Mahmoud and I did just that a few years ago with our Freshman students.  I actually searched Google directly and found that out of 83 graded assignments, 61 students plagiarized in some way. I’ve attached the presentation that I put together for the students.

See > English09CitationData

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 23, 2012 in Uncategorized